Blanchester Area Chamber of Commerce
Blanchester, OH 45107
More steps will be added each month. We are now on Step 8 of this 10 Step Plan. Check back each month for updates. Steps 1 through 5 have appeared in your newsletter. Future steps will appear online. To go straight to the latest step (step 8) in this 10 part series click here, or scroll down.

10-Step Business Plan for Safety.
STEP 1

Visible, Active Senior Management Leadership

For a safety program to be truly effective, it must start at the top. It should have a higher purpose than simply complying with OSHA. Although OSHA compliance is important, if that is the only purpose of a company's safety effort the safety program will not be as effective as it should be. Safety needs to be considered a core organizational value that directly contributes to the overall success, growth and profitability of the company. Safety is an investment in the continued success of the company.

Safety should start with a Mission Statement. That mission should reflect the importance safety has to the organization and it should tie directly into the overall

Corporate Mission.

The following is a sample of the Safety Mission Statement:

It is the full intent of our Corporation to provide as safe and healthful work environment as possible. By doing so we will protect our most vital assets and contribute directly to our company's continued growth, success and profitability.

What are a company's most valuable assets?
" Employees
" Property
" Equipment
" Service, Sales or Production Capabilities
" Financial Strength
" The Company's Good Name

This is what an effective safety program management system is designed to achieve. This will only happen if upper management takes the necessary leadership role to make it happen.

What should upper management be doing:

" Promote safety as a key organizational value. (This needs to be made clear to everyone in the company)
" Authorize needed resources to ensure the safety program is successful.
" Establish clear management safety responsibilities for all levels of management.
" Set high goals and standards for performance.
" Hold everyone accountable for the success of the program.
" Measure results and strive for continuous improvement.
" Stay actively involved in the process.
" Accept no excuse for failure.
" Constantly promote the value of the safety program.

MANAGEMENT SAFETY RESPONSIBILITIES

All levels of management are committed to ensuring that every effort is made to assure that safety is a primary consideration at all times. The following has been developed to clearly outline each management level's safety responsibilities.

SENIOR MANAGEMENT:

* Sets the tone and commitment for the safety program and
communicates this to all levels of management.

* Establishes yearly safety performance goals and objectives.

* Holds all levels of management responsible and accountable
for the safety performance of the company.

* Clearly demonstrates the company's commitment to the safety program by allocating appropriate resources, manpower and direction necessary to accomplish the company's goals and objectives.

* Reviews monthly statistical and injury reports and tracks
safety performance.

* Reviews all serious accidents and where appropriate expresses the company's concern to the injured employee and the employee's family.

SUPERVISORS:

* Follows closely and requires all of his/her employees to follow all safety rules and guidelines.

* Conducts new employee safety orientation and covers departmental specific safety training.

* Conducts monthly safety meetings and employee safety contacts.

* Thoroughly investigates all employee accidents and injuries. Reports these immediately to their department manager and takes the necessary corrective action as soon as possible.

* Conducts regular departmental safety inspections to ensure that safe working conditions are being maintained at all times.

* Corrects unsafe conditions and unsafe acts as they occur and documents corrective action taken on each.

* Communicates the company's commitment to the safety program to their employees and holds them accountable for their individual safety performance.



SAFETY COORDINATOR RESPONSIBILITIES

An appropriate management level individual will be designated as the Safety Coordinator. This individual will be given the necessary authority to carry out the responsibilities of the job. Management will give the individual the utmost support and cooperation.

The following responsibilities are included:

* Will conduct New Employee Safety Orientation and Training and will work closely with other employees that will be involved in safety training.

* Will conduct Facility Safety & Housekeeping Inspections and recommend needed corrections immediately.

* Will counsel employees on safe work behavior.

* Will communicate the effectiveness of the safety program to senior management.

* Will review the safety program constantly and update the program as necessary.

* Will review all accident reports and will investigate, along with
foremen/supervisors, all serious accidents.

* Will provide leadership in directing the safety program.

* Will work closely with foreman/supervisor on safety related issues.

* Will stay up to date on all OSHA regulations affecting the company and communicate changes to all management/employees.

* Will train all foremen/supervisors on the safety program and changes in company, state or federal safety regulations.

* Will lead by example and follow all company safety policies.


STEP 2

Employee Involvement and Recognition

Safety is a behavioral science not an engineering or technical science. The vast majority of things that cause employees to get hurt are behavioral in nature. Unfortunately, behavior is one of the hardest things to change, especially if employees have been allowed to develop bad habits. These habits usually go unnoticed or unchanged until someone has had an accident. Once this has happened we often try to determine blame, instead of finding the root cause. Most of the time the causes are easy to see if we only open our eyes and start observing why our employees do what they do.

One of the best ways to determine why employees behave the way they do is simply to ask them. When you observe employees working in an unsafe manner and ask them about their behavior they will often times provide you with legitimate reasons. These reasons need to be addressed with them in a positive manner. Listen, act and then follow up:
" Ask your employees for suggestions on improving the safety program.
" Review accidents with them and ask them for their recommendations.
" Set up a Safety Suggestion program to solicit good ideas.
" Set up a Safety Committee or Safety Improvement Team.

A Safety Committee or Safety Improvement training is an excellent way to get employees involved in the safety process. Select employees who want to be a part of the team, but make sure all employees have the opportunity for input.

The Committee or Team should be involved in the following activities:
" Helping write up new safety policies.
" Conducting new employee or ongoing safety training.
" Conducting plant safety inspections.
" Counseling other employees on safe work practices.
" Helping the company conduct accident investigations.
" Listening to employee's complaints and working with management to resolve them in a positive manner.
" Conducting Safety Observations to ensure safe work practices are being followed.
" Assisting in conducting safety inspections.

The more employees are involved, the easier it is to change long standing unsafe behaviors. If employees buy into the safety program, everybody's job in this area will be easier. Remember, however, that there has to be a genuine effort on management's part and their effort has to be supported on a continuous basis.

In addition to getting employees involved in the safety program it is important to recognize and reward employees for their efforts. Everyone likes to win and be associated with a winner. Make being safe a winning goal for your company. Train your supervisors to use positive counseling techniques when dealing with behavioral safety problems. This reduces unnecessary confrontations and puts safety in a positive light, instead of a negative one.

Other things you can do include:

" Establish a program to identify, and formally recognize employees for excellence in accident prevention.
" Recognize good suggestions.
" Set company safety performance goals and reward employees upon successful attainment.
" Say positive things to employees when you see they are making the extra effort to be safe.
" Put articles in the company newsletter about good safety performance.
" Take your Safety Committee or Safety Improvement Team to the annual All Ohio Safety Congress to recognize their efforts and support.

A pat on the back, a kind word, public recognition or rewards, all make us feel better about what we are doing. If safety is important to the company, make it important to the employees. The money you spend will be returned many times in safer, more productive and happier employees.

STEP 3

Medical Treatment and Return to Work Practices

Proper medical care for employees and early return to work procedures can greatly reduce claim cost and reduce unnecessary legal involvement and expenses. The following steps can be helpful in ensuring quality medical care and quick return to work for employees.

" Establish a close working relationship with the Managed Care Organization selected by your company.
" Communicate with the physicians, clinics and hospitals anytime an employee is injured.
" Educate medical providers about the nature of your business.
" Educate your employees about your medical procedures and procedures for obtaining medical treatment.
" Have employees report all injuries immediately.
" If employees are off work, set up a program of regular and frequent communication with the injured employee.
" Provide any assistance the employee needs during his/her recovery.
" Keep the employee advised of company functions and activities.
" Establish a modified duty program, that will allow injured workers, where possible, to return to work in a productive capacity during the recuperation period.
" Work with the employee's physician and provide the physician a list of job duties for his/her approval.
" If appropriate, work with an Ohio Bureau of Workers' Compensation Rehabilitation specialist.
" Be as flexible as possible and always welcome the employee back to work.
ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION REPORT


Employee Name Date of Injury Time of Injury Location of Accident


Employee Dept. Employee Length of Body Part Injured
Position Service


Nature of Injury First Aid Medical Treatment Required Lost Time


Was there a Written Safety Procedure in place? Yes No

Was the Procedure specific and did it cover the actions the employee was involved in when injured?
Yes No

Was there training in these Safety Procedures? Yes No

Was the training specific and did it cover the actions the employee was involved in that caused the accident? Yes No

Were the proper tools and equipment supplied to do the job? Yes No

Did supervisors conduct regular performance observations? Yes No

Was employee counseling and enforcement conducted where necessary?
Yes No

Was the employee following established Safety Procedures? Yes No

If not, why not?





What actions are being taken to eliminate the causes of the accident (fill out in detail)







When will the recommendations be completed?

Who will be involved in this process?



Completed by Date


EMPLOYEE INJURY REPORT


NAME: DATE REPORTED:


DEPARTMENT: TIME REPORTED:


DATE OF OCCURRENCE: DAY OF WEEK: TIME:


LOCATION OF OCCURRENCE:


SUPERVISOR NAME:


JOB EMPLOYEE PERFORMING AT TIME OF OCCURRENCE:



DESCRIPTION OF WHAT OCCURRED (GIVE COMPLETE DETAILS INCLUDING WHERE, WHEN, HOW,
AND WHY):





IN YOUR OPINION, WHY DID THE ACCIDENT OR INJURY TAKE PLACE?



IDENTIFY PARTS OF YOUR BODY INJURED:



WHAT PIECE OF EQUIPMENT INJURED YOU, IF APPLICABLE?



LIST ALL WITNESSES TO OCCURRENCE, OR PERSONS NEARBY AT THE TIME:



AT ANY TIME IN THE LAST FIVE YEARS, WERE YOU UNDER DOCTOR'S CARE FOR SAME OR

SIMILAR INJURIES? IF SO, WHEN?



DATE EMPLOYEE SIGNATURE



TRANSITIONAL DUTY PROGRAM

Every effort will be made by our company to provide a safe and healthful work environment for all our employees. However, from time to time there may be the possibility of one of our employees being injured. If that happens, the employee will be transported to the nearest emergency medical facility for proper treatment. The employee will be returned to work if possible.

In the event an employee is injured but can not return to work immediately to regular duty, a Transitional Duty Program has been established. This program is designed to get valuable employees back to productive work as soon as possible, following an injury. Work requirements will be kept within any physical work limitations placed on the employee by his/her treating physician.

The company will work closely with our injured employee and their treating physician. The treating physician will be notified of our Transitional Duty Program and our desire to work with the physician to return our injured employee to productive employment in an expeditious manner. We will request a list from the physician of work restrictions. These will then be reviewed, and work activities within these restrictions will be identified and the physician will be advised so the employee can be returned to work. Once the employee returns to work, every effort will be made to ensure the work activities are kept within the employees medical limitations.

The Transitional Duty Program will be reviewed on an employee by employee basis. It may not be possible in every case to match up the physical restrictions with available work activities. In those cases the employee will be advised. Close follow up with the physician will be maintained and, as soon as the employee is physically capable, he/she will be returned to active employment. Once the physical limitations have been removed, the employee will be returned to full duty.

The length of time transitional duty is made available will be at the company's discretion. Every effort will be made to accommodate the needs of our injured employees, but transitional duty is not a substitute for normal work duties. If it is felt that the Transitional Duty Program is not achieving the desired goal for a particular employee, the program for the employee may be terminated at the company's request. The company will continue to work closely with the injured employee and his/her treating physician to ensure the employee returns to normal productive employment if possible.


STEP 4

Communication

Ongoing and active communication is a key element in an effective safety program. All too often this is an area that is not utilized to its full potential. Employees are interested in how the company is doing from a safety standpoint.

They, also, have many good ideas that can help improve the overall company safety program. Many employees do not offer good ideas because they either do not believe they will be implemented or they are not comfortable in communicating these to their supervisors.

In order for communication to be successful, employees need to be made active participants. Communication needs to be encouraged and fostered. Employees need to be encouraged to inform you of safety related problems without fear of reprisal. These items should be addressed as soon as possible and the employee advised of the action taken. It is, also, extremely important that employees feel that they are being listened to and that their opinions matter.

Ongoing communication methods should include the following:

Informal Personal Contact

This includes talking to employees on the floor at work on a regular basis about safety concerns. This should be done as managers or supervisors tour the work areas. Good ideas should be recognized and rewarded.

Open Door Policy

Inform employees that supervisors or the safety coordinator are available to confidentially discuss safety related items or concerns.

Monthly Safety Meetings

Safety meetings should be held on a regular basis. The meeting, number of employees in attendance, and subject discussed should be turned in to the safety coordinator.

The following tips are provided to assist in making the meetings successful:

1. Prepare for the meeting by reviewing the subject matter that is to be discussed in advance.

2. Gather your employees into a group so that you may be easily heard.

3. Start on time.

4. Give employees an opportunity to report safety concerns and give suggestions.

5. Report progress on correcting unsafe conditions previously reported.

6. Discuss all accidents and close calls experienced by the group. Determine how
to prevent a recurrence.

7. Discuss the company's safety record - Good or Bad.

8. Plan the meeting to cover one pertinent topic.

9. Get the employees involved by asking questions. Use examples from your own experiences that relate to the subject matter.

10. The meeting should run about 10 minutes - more time if the subject warrants it.

Written Communication

This is an excellent method to keep employees advised of changes in the safety program, the company accident record, new programs or employee safety suggestions.

Written communications can include the following:
* Company Newsletter
* Safety Handbook
* Notices
* Letters to employees

Postings

This can be in the form of Safety Bulletin Boards which can be used to inform employees of safety notices, meetings, etc.

Safety Posters are another form of communication used to remind employees of the dangers and safe work practices.


Step 5

Timely Notification of Claims


Requirements
Employers must report claims immediately to the managed care organization (MCO), which reports the claim to BWC within 24 hours. The employer will comply with all requirements for reporting claims to the employer's MCO as specified under the HPP rules.

Implementation
When an injury occurs, first arrange for medical care for the employee. Next, investigate and document the circumstances, and report the injury to the claim handler.
Reporting claims quickly:
" Demonstrates care and concern for the employee;
" Prevents delays and/or confusion in the claim process;
" Reduces the potential for fraud or abuse;
" Reduces the potential for needless litigation.
Through timely reporting of claims, you:
" Establish an open line of communication;
" Develop accurate information to manage the workers' compensation claim;
" Provide benefits to the injured employee on a timely basis.

Step 6

Safety and Health Process Coordination and Employer Education

Each company will be required by the new rules to appoint an individual, as the company Safety Coordinator. This individual, will need to be given the necessary time, authority and resources to facilitate developing the company's safety program. The Safety Coordinator must demonstrate an interest in employee safety and have a high level of trust from the employees.

All levels of management must be willing to work with the Safety Coordinator and support the company safety efforts. The Safety Coordinator is responsible for over seeing the company safety program and working with management and employees, but he/she cannot assume duties and responsibilities that need to be carried out by line management.

The following is a list of some of the responsibilities a Safety Coordinator should be responsible for:

" Overall coordination of the safety and health program
" Training of management and employees in safety responsibilities and specific safety related topics.
" Maintaining an updated knowledge of safety and health regulations.
" Review of all accidents and assisting supervisors in conducting accident investigations.
" Tracking the overall progress of the safety program and communicating this to management and employees.
" Providing assistance and advice to management and employees on safety related issues.
" Conducting regular safety inspections.
" Following up on employee concerns and complaints.
" Working with the company safety committee.
" Developing new safety policies and procedures as necessary to help improve the safety program.
" Compiling injury and illness statistics and related records.




SAFETY TRAINING GUIDELINES

OBJECTIVES:

This section is intended to ensure that all of Our Company personnel are trained in the development of safe working practices and to enforce accident prevention measures that support Our Company "Safety Policy".

GENERAL SCOPE:

To provide employees training in the identification of potential accident exposures. To apply appropriate corrective measures to eliminate hazards and/or exposure and to notify supervision immediately.

SPECIFIC SCOPE:

Provide special training for work exercises that deal with specific known physical and/or health hazards that cannot be eliminated from the work place.

GENERAL TRAINING SESSIONS:

Safety training meetings shall be conducted presenting subjects that best cover general safety concerns which should include, but not be limited to, the following:

General Work Rules Good Housekeeping
Flammables & Combustible Liquids Proper Lifting Procedures
Electrical Safety Personal Protective Equipment
Hazard Communication Program Company Safety Policy
Employee Commitment to Safety Lockout/Tagout Procedures
Dressing for Safety Ladders and Platforms
Hand and Power Tools Safety Bloodborne Pathogens
Safe use of Fire Extinguishers Safe Means of Egress
Fire Prevention Procedures Injury Reporting Procedures
and Emergency Evacuation Plan Reporting Unsafe Conditions
Working with Subcontractor's Minor First Aid Procedures
Employees
Facility Specific Safety Concerns





Other topics as considered by Our Company

SPECIFIC TRAINING SESSIONS:

Specific training will be conducted on an as needed basis or prior to exposure covering the following areas, but not limited to only these areas:

Fork Lift Operator Training Confined Space Entry
Welding & Cutting Safety Hearing Conservation
Procedures Power Platforms & Manlifts
Selection, use and care of Hoists and Slings
Respirators including Fit
Testing

Other topics as identified by Our Company.

The above training topics will be reviewed on a regular basis and updated to comply with changes in Federal, State, and Local Codes.

Training sessions will be conducted by the Supervisor or a designated instructor. Where required by OSHA, training will be documented and all employees will be required to sign-off on a sign-off sheet indicating they have received the proper training.

Where it appears that employees could benefit, retraining will be given in one or more of the above areas. Employees having difficulty understanding any of the above procedures will be given additional training if it is felt necessary.



SUPERVISOR SAFETY MEETINGS

Safety meetings conducted by each supervisor are to be held each month, preferably during the first week of the month. The meeting, number of employees in attendance, and subject discussed are to be turned in to the department manager.

The following tips are provided to assist in making the meetings successful:

1. Gather your employees into a group so that you may be easily heard.

2. Start on time.

3. Give employees a chance to report safety concerns and give suggestions.

4. Report progress on correcting unsafe conditions previously reported.

5. Discuss all accidents and close calls experienced by the group. Determine how to prevent a recurrence.

6. Discuss the company's safety record - Good or Bad.

7. Advise of new programs or procedures to be implemented.

Safety Topics

1. Review the topics in advance -- take notes on important points to be discussed.

2. Relate the topic to your area.

3. Note key points (no more than 5) you want to cover in this meeting.

4. List two questions for each key point to ask employees.

5. Start the discussion with a story or example.

6. Get employees involved by asking them for other examples or stories.

7. Lead the meeting -- don't read the topic.

8. Cover the key points -- one by one using the questions.

9. Close the meeting with a re-cap.

10. Ask employees if there are any final questions.

11. Complete the safety meeting report.

12. Follow-up on items noted by employees.




SAFETY MEETING - SUPERVISOR'S REPORT

Date__________________________

Supervisor____________________________________________________________


Subject of Meeting:_____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________

Attendance: (Names)___________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________

REMARKS: Unsafe conditions and suggestions offered by employees
or other supervisors for correction of hazardous conditions.

____________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________
(Send original to the office and copies as directed.)

Step 7

Written Orientation & Training Plan

Proper safety training is one of the most important aspects of an effective safety program. New employees need to be taught the company's safety policies, specific job safety requirements and mandated OSHA training. The goal of safety training is not only to convey knowledge, but to develop the proper attitude towards safety and establish safe work practices from the beginning.

All supervisors and management employees need to be put through a thorough safety training orientation. To ensure that new employees are put through the necessary safety training, and that this training is documented properly, new Employee Safety Orientation guidelines should be developed.

In addition to the New Employee Safety Orientation Training the following types of training should be included in your training program:

* Ongoing refresher safety training.
* OSHA required follow-up training.
* Job specific when employees are transferred to different jobs.
* Follow-up training when behavior indicates retraining is needed.
* Anytime a new substance, process or procedure or equipment is introduced.
* On any accidents that could be repeated.

Training should be documented and the documentation should include the date, subject, instructor's name and names of employees receiving the training.

NEW EMPLOYEE SAFETY TRAINING SIGN-OFF FORM

In order to ensure that all new employees are receiving the safety training necessary to work safely at Our Company and meet OSHA specific safety training requirements, this checklist has been developed. Each item outlined is to be reviewed with each new employee. After the training has been completed and the trainer is convinced the new employee adequately comprehends the training, the trainer is to check-off each item. The trainer and new employee are to sign the bottom of the form.

The form will be filed in the employee's personnel file.

Company Policy Statement Lockout/Tagout Procedures

Employee Commitment to Safety Proper Lifting

General Work Rules Reporting Unsafe Conditions

Personal Protective Equipment Hearing Conservation

Hazard Communication Program Fire Extinguisher Safety

Reporting Injuries Bloodborne Pathogens

Emergency Evacuation Procedures Company Policy for Enforcing Safe Work Practices
Housekeeping


I, , the designated safety trainer have covered the above areas with

on (Date) and am confident that he/she understands each

of the above areas and will be able to use the information effectively.


I, , have received the training on each of the above areas. I

understand that safe work behavior is a condition of employment and that I am required to work

safely at all times.


Step 8

Written and Communicated Safe Work Practices

Safe work practices are essential to a safe work environment. Written procedures should be developed and used to guide your company's safety effort. These in turn need to be communicated to all management and hourly employees.

The safety manual or handbook should include company wide work practices, OSHA specific written procedures and job or task specific safe operating procedures. The manual should also include Safety Policy Statement, Management and Employee Responsibilities and General Work Rules. Ask your employees or Safety Committee to help in developing these guidelines.

Examples of some of the information that should be included:

" Safety Policy Statement
" Management and Employee Safety Responsibilities
" Safety Coordinator Responsibilities
" General Work Rules
" Housekeeping
" Proper Lifting
" Personal Protective Equipment
" First Aid Procedures
" Hazard Communication
" Lockout/Tagout
" Fire Extinguisher Operation
" Safe Use of Tools and Equipment
" Machine Guarding and Safe Operating Procedures
" Emergency Evacuation
" Bloodborne Pathogens if applicable
" Job Specific Safe Work Practices

Other items should be included as necessary.



SAFETY MANUAL
TABLE OF CONTENTS

SECTION I GENERAL
A. SAFETY POLICY STATEMENT
B. EMPLOYEE COMMITMENT TO SAFETY
C. MANAGEMENT SAFETY RESPONSIBILITIES
D. SUPERVISOR SAFETY RESPONSIBILITIES
E. SAFETY COMMITTEE GUIDELINES
F. SAFETY COORDINATOR RESPONSIBILITIES
G. EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES
H. REPORTING AND CORRECTING UNSAFE CONDITIONS
I. SAFE WORK RULES AND PRACTICES
J. POSITIVE COUNSELING
K. CORRECTING UNSAFE BEHAVIOR
L. TRANSITIONAL DUTY POLICY

SECTION II SAFETY TRAINING
A. SAFETY TRAINING GUIDELINES
B. HOW TO TRAIN
C. SUPERVISOR SAFETY MEETINGS
D. SAFETY MEETING SUPERVISOR'S REPORT
E. NEW EMPLOYEE SAFETY TRAINING SIGN-OFF FORM
F. DEPARTMENT SPECIFIC SAFETY TRAINING CHECK-OFF FORM

SECTION III EMPLOYER SAFETY PROCEDURES
A. GENERAL HOUSEKEEPING GUIDELINES
B. SAFE LIFTING
C. ACCIDENT REPORTING AND INVESTIGATION GUIDELINES/FORM
" SUPERVISOR ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION FORM
" EMPLOYEE INJURY REPORT
D. PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
E. MEDICAL SERVICES AND FIRST AID
F. ACCIDENT/INJURY CLEAN-UP PLAN
(BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS GUIDELINES)
G. MONTHLY SAFETY INSPECTION GUIDELINES

SECTION IV SPECIAL SAFETY PROCEDURES
A. ELECTRICAL SAFETY GUIDELINES
B. HEARING CONSERVATION GUIDELINES
C. FLOOR, PLATFORM AND WALL OPENING PROTECTION
D. LOCKOUT/TAGOUT GUIDELINES
E. HAZARD COMMUNICATION GUIDELINES
F. MAINTENANCE WELDING AND CUTTING
G. PRODUCTION WELDING AND CUTTING
H. HOT WORK PROCEDURES AND PERMIT
I. RESPIRATORY PROTECTION GUIDELINES
J. CONFINED SPACE ENTRY GUIDELINES



SAFETY MANUAL
TABLE OF CONTENTS

SECTION V SAFE USE OF EQUIPMENT AND TOOLS
A. SAFE USE OF STEP, PORTABLE AND EXTENSION LADDERS
B. SAFE USE OF HAND, PORTABLE POWERED AND AIR POWER TOOLS
C. CRANE AND HOISTING EQUIPMENT SAFETY
D. SAFE USE OF COMPRESSED GAS CYLINDERS AND COMPRESSED AIR EQUIPMENT
E. MACHINE GUARDING

SECTION VI FIRE PROTECTION AND EMERGENCY ACTION PLAN
A. FIRE PREVENTION PLAN
B. SAFE USE AND HANDLING OF FLAMMABLE AND COMBUSTIBLE
LIQUIDS
C. SAFE USE OF PORTABLE FIRE EXTINGUISHERS
D. EMERGENCY REPORTING AND EVACUATION PROCEDURES

SECTION VII MATERIAL HANDLING EQUIPMENT
A. FORK-LIFT SAFETY PROGRAM
B. MANUAL AND ELECTRICALLY OPERATED PALLET JACKS

SECTION VIII OSHA
A. WHAT OSHA EXPECTS
B. OSHA RECORDKEEPING FORMS/GUIDELINES
C. OSHA INSPECTION PROCESS
D. WHAT TO DO IN CASE OF AN OSHA INSPECTION
E. ACCESS TO EMPLOYEE EXPOSURE AND MEDICAL RECORDS



STEP 10

Recordkeeping & Data Analysis

Like any successful program, what is measured gets done, this applies to effective safety management as well. One of the major problems in getting support for the safety program is lack of communication on the effectiveness of the program. Results oriented data such as workers' compensation cost, injury frequency, rates and trends need to be reviewed evaluated and communicated regularly. Supervisors and employees need to know what is going on, they are interested and usually want the company to be successful.

Performance targets should be established and communicated to all management and hourly employees.

The following are examples of areas that can and should be measured that will reflect in the success of the safety program:

" OSHA incident rate - this can be compared against the National average for your SIC code or against your results for last year. To determine your incident rate, simply multiply the number of OSHA Recordable Injuries by 200,000 then divide by total man-hours worked. This will give you the number of employees per 100 that are being injured.

" Days without either an OSHA recordable accident or lost time accident. The days should be posted in the work area and updated daily.

" Workers Compensation claim cost compared yearly.

" Cost per hour or item produced.

" Supervisory tasks completed during the year against established targets.

" Number of safe miles driven without an incident or accident.

" Safety audit results compared yearly (similar to the safety survey that was sent out in the fall to all group members).

Performance oriented information can enable a company to continue to track safety performance and make improvements in the safety program. Management can be held accountable and employees can be recognized and rewarded. Problem areas can be addressed before serious problems in the safety program develops.


MONTHLY INJURY REPORT
First Aid Only 0
Medical Only 1
OSHA Recordable 2
Lost Time 3
Other 4
Month of




EMPLOYEE NAME DATE OF INJURY
DEPT. TYPE OF INJURY CAUSE OF INJURY OSHA SEV. LOST DAYS

MONTHLY STATISTICAL SAFETY REPORT



Company: Location: Date:

Month: Year:

Monthly Report

Number of hours worked this month:

No. of OSHA Recordable injuries OSHA Incident Rate
No. of OSHA Recordable Lost OSHA Lost Time
Time Injuries Incident Rate
No. of OSHA Lost Work Day Total Lost Day Cases
Cases Lost Time/Light Duty Incident Rate

Year to Date Report

Number of hours worked year to date:

No. of OSHA recordable injuries OSHA Incident Rate
No. of OSHA recordable Lost OSHA Lost Time
Time injuries Incident Rate
No. of OSHA Lost Work Day Total Lost Work Day Cases
Cases Lost Time/Light Duty Incident Rate

General Industrial Classification Rates (SIC)

OSHA Incident Rate
OSHA Lost Work Days
Lost Time Work Day Cases
(Lost Time/Light Duty)


NOTE: To figure out the OSHA Incident Rate and the OSHA Lost Time Incident Rate, multiply the number of incidents by 200,000, then divide by the number of hours worked.

To figure out the Severity Rate, multiply the number of lost days by 200,000, then divide by the hours worked.


Step 9

A Written Safety and Health Policy Statement

Your statement should define your company's commitment to your safety program.
" It needs to be signed by the company's Owner, President or other key Senior Management official.
" It should be put on company letterhead and posted where all employees can read it.
" It should also be reviewed with all new employees at the time they are hired so they know that safety is an important concern to management.

Do not fall into the trap of outlining a list of safety rules that your employees will be expected to follow and use this as your Safety Policy Statement. Safety rules should be implemented but they should be separate. Instead your Safety Policy Statement should show your concern for your employees and your commitment for protecting their safety.

A Safety Policy Statement should open similar to this:

Our Company is committed to providing the safest possible working environment and conditions for our employees. The safety of employees is a prime concern to management and critical to continued success and growth. With this in mind the following commitment is being made to prevent unnecessary injuries:

" Management recognizes that safety is a core management value and that the prevention of employee injuries is an important part of our business.
" Safe working conditions will be provided and maintained.
" Employees will be trained in safe work practices.
" Safe procedures will be developed and communicated to all employees.
" Management is open to any ideas or suggestions from employees that will help improve the overall safety effort of the company.
" Employees will be encouraged to follow safe work practices and, where necessary, safety policies and rules will be enforced.
" Every effort will be made, when practicable, to return injured employees to transitional work.
" Safety is good business, good for our employees and good for the company.

The above items can be amended or other ones added for your particular company, but this will give you a good guide to follow.

A closing paragraph should be added similar to the following:

The prevention of employee injuries is of the utmost importance to the company and a key ingredient to the continued success and growth of the company. We urge all our employees to join with us to make our company the safest possible place to work.
____________________________________________
Owner/ President/ or Key Senior Management Official

SAFETY POLICY STATEMENT


Our Company is committed to providing the safest possible working environment and conditions for our employees. The safety of our employees is a prime concern to management. With this in mind the following management commitment is being made to prevent unnecessary injuries to our employees.

* All members of management recognize that safety
is an integral part of their job duties and are
responsible for preventing these injuries.

* Safe working conditions are an essential part of
our business.

* All employees are to be properly and thoroughly
trained in safe work practices and are to understand
the importance placed on working safely each day.

* Management is open to any suggestions which will
help improve the safety of our employees.

* Safety is simply good business. Good for our employees
and good for the company.

The prevention of employee injuries is of the utmost importance and a key ingredient to the continued success and growth of our company. We urge each of you to join with us in committing to make Our Company the safest possible place to work.


__________________________


(This form is to be typed on company letterhead and signed by the owner or president, then posted for all employees to see)